I was “chatting” with a client over the Internet regarding career alternatives based on some assessment work we had done to unearth what I liked to call their “Best Stuff.” As he was recounting some of the potential options coming up, his email opined, “Here I go again… rambling…”

One may argue that this was indeed true, but my instinctive response was, “I like ‘rambling’… it’s when you get to see the most scenery.” The more I thought about my response, the more I liked it! (my friend Scott Ginsberg, at http://www.hellomynameisscott.com, once said, “If you don’t quote yourself, no one else will!”)

Here are some of my key points on why I’m a fan of Rambling:Career Road Map

  1. You DO get to see more “scenery.”

A straight line may be the shortest distance between two points, but it also reduces your field of peripheral vision substantially. If your travel is a bit more meandering, including switchbacks, occasional detours and winding roads, you may not get “there” (wherever THERE is!) as quickly, but you will certainly have a lot more to look at. I see this as a good thing. The more scenery that you see, the more opportunity you have to discover a marvelous “destination” that you never knew existed.

  1. It bucks the traditional vocational system.

I feel for the job seekers and careerists who invest almost all of their time and energy in newspapers, the Internet, employment agencies, company career ladders and other “traditional” resources. To be sure, these methods all represent possibilities for success and may even hold clues to their career development or next position. The problem is: they are investigating the smallest number of opportunities in direct competition with the largest number of candidates. My statistics training goes back a few years, but these don’t sound like good odds to me! Rambling can get you beyond “the smell of the greasepaint and roar of the crowd” and may actually be the shortest distance to get to the better career destinations, whether you are seeking or new job or wish to grow in your present position.

  1. It starts the “trip” sooner instead of later.

If You Don’t Know Where You’re Going, You’ll Probably End Up Somewhere Else, an excellent book by Dr. David Campbell, makes some strong points supporting a targeted career process. The problem is, I’ve had many clients who were loathe to even start a Career Road Trip until they could describe their final destination in clear, concise almost meticulous detail. Since they couldn’t do so, they never started and remained parked in their vocational driveway, never even backing out onto the road. With apologies to Dr. Campbell, I may rephrase his title to “If You Wait to Figure Out Exactly Where You’re Going, You May End Up Staying Right Where You Are.”

  1. It increases the possibility of “luck” showing up.

Luck, serendipity or delightful surprises are hardly ever planned, but they have a greater opportunity to show up for the Rambler than the Laser-Guided Careerist. To requote one of my favorite authors, Barbara Sher, “The amount of good luck that comes your way depends on your willingness to act.” (From I Could Do Anything If I Only Knew What It Was). Rambling creates the dynamics for serendipity to show up.

Allow me to “ramble” just a bit more on this subject. Here’s what you should do:

  • Get a general idea of where your trip is headed.
  • Unplug the GPS.
  • Pull out of your driveway, take off and keep your eyes open.

You may be surprised by what you drive by!

I owe this phrase (and the name of my organization) tImageo an excellent little book by Marsha Sinetar, To Build the Life You Want, Create the Work You Love. In this helpful tome, the author applies the ubiquitous Hierarchy of Needs developed by Abraham Maslow in 1954 (Air, Water, Food, etc. up to Self-actualization) to career development. Her version of Maslow’s pyramid describes the apex as “vocational integration,” a rather abstract appellation to be sure, but she also describes it this way: “Work as Gift of Self.”

I must confess to some professional jealousy. I wish I had coined this rich statement. “Work as Gift of Self” means that, as you describe what are doing, you are not merely recounting a bullet list of tasks and responsibilities that are known as your Job Description. You are describing yourself, your God-given passions, interests, values and most cherished skills. I have added the phrase (OK, this one is mine) “What you do should be who you are” to enhance this brilliant concept.

Does this mean that everything we do must cause us to be deliriously happy, enraptured by our duties, fully consumed in the joy of the responsibilities before us? Oh, please, cut me a break! I have always said that every activity, even those that we cherish most, will often include some of what I have termed “Grown Up Stuff” – duties that are necessary even though we would drop them in a New York minute. But, if most of what you are doing can be categorized as “Grown Up Stuff,” I would respectfully suggest that you should be doing something else!

So as you approach your daily “To Do List”, are you “giving of yourself” or just crossing off items to get to the end of the work day? If your answer is behind Door #2, we should talk!

Conversation with some clients recently inspired me to revisit an earlier blog that emphasized a significant statistic quoted during hockey games: “SHOTS ON GOAL.”

It’s not hard to figure out why this is a critical measure of success. IF YOU DON’T SHOOT, YOU’LL NEVER SCORE! To be sure, you want to develop some skill in executing these shots, but waiting for the perfect line for that killer slap shot that’s featured on SportsCenter will likely keep you from ever scoring!

In the same way, if you choose to take limited action in advancing your search, your career explorations, your professional and personal  growth, etc., you’ll likely end up with exactly what you put into it: BUPKISS  (nothing, or precious little of value)! To quote the Great One, Wayne Gretzky: “You miss 100% of the shots you don’t take!”

So, exactly what is the “shots on goal” statistic for your career development?

Bird-In-Hand

…inspired by a town in eastern Lancaster County…

Well, it’s finally happened.  Perhaps your hard work of pounding the pavement has yielded results.  Or, some kind soul has relented.  Or, you just “got lucky.”

At any rate, you now have a job offer. Being employed is a good thing, and this is not a bad position.  To be brutally honest, you could do worse… MUCH worse!  But, continuing to be honest, this is NOT the job of your dreams.  In better economic times, you would probably respond “Thanks, but no thanks” to their offer.

However, these are NOT better times and you’ve gotten used to eating regularly, having insurance and a roof over your head.  Although not ideal, this position can assist in these areas.  So, what do you do?  To quote Jack Nicholson from a recent movie, “What if this is as good as it gets?” Maybe the job of your dreams, or even a more attractive opportunity is just not coming.  In these challenging times, thinking about Career Nirvana may be a pipe dream.  Be happy that someone wants you! After all, “A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush,” right?

Maybe, maybe not. Let’s take some time to think through this situation.  If you’re truly “sitting on” an offer right now, be smart enough to ask for some time to review it, talk to those you trust, call your career coach, etc., before you make a commitment.  If you have other job searches in process, be sure to advise any potential employer that you’ve just been offered a position but you are still interested in them.  Can they give you a sense of your chances?  This may encourage them to take action, or at least let you know where you stand.  I like to use language like, “Help me make the best decision here.  Do you see me as a serious candidate?  When do you anticipate making your hiring decision?” If they have no real answer, then it may be time to move on.

Regarding the position “in the hand,” does it meet the criteria for what Barbara Sher calls a “Good Enough Job?” That’s a position that allows you, at least, to make ends meet, to keep your options open, perhaps to continue your search, to feed your better self with hobbies, volunteering, other activities, etc.

Allow me to share my Three Rules for considering just such a position:

Rule One: Can you just go do it, without a lot of additional training or investment? It doesn’t make sense to invest in training, certification, etc. that you have no desire to use in better times.

Rule Two: Will it allow you the time to work on activities that can create opportunities for a better position, or allow you to invest in building up skills, knowledge and experience to make you more marketable? If not, it will end up being all you do!

Rule Three may be the most important:  Can you enjoy it at all? Even if the job isn’t part of your long-term career goals, will the duties bring some level of satisfaction?  If not, you’re likely to find yourself bogged down physically, emotionally and spiritually to the point that you’d better not interview for The Job of Your Dreams, because your performance as a candidate will place you in the Reject Pile.

Take the time to work through all of the pluses and minuses of the offer at hand.  Seek to negotiate for a better offer, if you can.  Endeavor to evaluate the offer in a comprehensive manner, talk to trusted individuals, then make your decision.

OK, let’s say you take the position.  What’s next?  Give them 110%? Eat, drink, sleep and breathe the company slogan?  Get a tattoo of the corporate logo?  Commit your everlasting soul to the company mission statement? Oh, please!

Certainly do a great job, learn all you can and forge positive working relationships. Demonstrate integrity, honesty and the good old Protestant Work Ethic.

And, one more thing:  KEEP LOOKING! Yes, you read that right.  Do the best job you can, but continue to network, keeping your eyes and ears open for other opportunities.  This position may work out for you, but there are certainly no guarantees these days. To quote the credo of the excellent site http://www.careerrealism.com, “Because EVERY Job is Temporary.”

I once read that the web portal YAHOO is an acronym for “You Always Have Other Options.” I truly believe that these days we all need to keep our eyes and ears open, continue networking, looking for the “two in the bush” even when we do have the “bird in the hand.”  This is not to be disloyal to your new position (which I am SURE you would never do), but to keep your ear to the ground just in case.

Then, if things don’t work out with this situation, you have OO (Other Options).

In his excellent book ”Go Put Your Strengths to Work,” Marcus Buckingham introduces what he describes as the 3 myths regarding strengths. Whether you agree with his premises or not, they are certainly worth considering.

Ready? Here they are:

1) As you grow, your personality changes. Individuals certainly make adjustments, have new experiences, mature, acquire new skills and knowledge, etc., but the core of the person stays pretty much the same. You should become intimate with what bicepI like to call “your best stuff,” because that’s where you will be the most accomplished and satisfied. This is the reason, by the way, that I named my business “Gift of Self Career Services.” What you do should be who you are!

2) You will grow the most in your areas of greatest weakness. As a consultant, I used to tell people “It’s not a weakness, it’s an opportunity for development.” True, to some degree, but it’s still a weakness! Spending an inordinate amount of time working away to move a weakness into an ability that is barely adequate cannot begin to match the contribution when one is using their strengths to contribute to the organization. This does not mean, by the way, that you get a pass on your weak areas, just that more time should be spent on growing “your best stuff.”

3) A good team member does whatever it takes to help the team. If this means finding the areas in the task, project, assignment, etc. where the team member’s strengths can contribute the most, this is a true statement, If, however, it means that individuals who are less talented in certain areas should step into these tasks, both the team and the individuals suffer. A good team member will help the entire team to identify and assign duties to match the strengths of each member. That’s where the true ROI (Return On Investment) can take place!

Interesting take on strengths and weaknesses, is it not?

What’s that? You say your Latin is a bit rusty? This extraordinary phrase comes from two of my Saturday morning heroes – Tom and Ray Magliozzi (a.k.a. “Click and Clack, the Tappet Brothers” from Car Talk, now airing classic shows with the sad passing of Tom). If this does not connect with any of you, I urge you to tune in a PBS radio station in your area at 10 AM on the afore-mentioned day for their car advice (AND raucous Cambridge laughter). An absolute delight, they even include good automotive information at times!

This Latin phrase was one of their deeply held credos, notably accredited to Tom (on the left). When they were queried as to how they were able to respond to call-ingty_car_talk_Tom_and_Ray_Magliozzi_jt_120609_wg questions as quickly as they did, their response (translated into Latin for the more erudite among us) was “We’re ‘unencumbered by the thought process!’”

I’ve shamelessly adopted this as one of my mantras, to the point of once having it emblazoned over the door to my office (to challenge myself as well as my clients. I even donated to my local PBS station to score the coffee mug!). Why? One of MY deeply held credos is as follows: “We should think less and act more.” In Hare Brain, Tortoise Mind, the author Guy Claxon notes how “thinking less can make you more intelligent.” We often spend so much time thinking through options and potential outcomes that action never ensues. This impacts opportunities for all, since failure to act on something virtually guarantees failure to achieve much of anything.

To be sure, we need to engage what Hercule Poirot called “the little grey cells” as we move ahead in our work and lives, but I would humbly suggest that you include this Latin phrase in your “career toolbox” as well.

Don’t be so encumbered by the thought process! Think a little less and act more!

bonus - scrabbleMany individuals who would be entertaining retirement in a better economy are finding themselves staying in the workforce much longer. Sometimes this is the result of finances, and other times it is more a case of their not being ready to stop working. After all, daytime television seems to be a vast wasteland, and the “To Do” list can become the “It’s Done” list. This decision, of course, places them in the position of both competing with as well as potentially working for individuals who could be decades their junior! How can these “mature” candidates make the case for their contributions to their company?

Although the following characteristics are hardly exclusive to the “older worker,” here are some suggestions as to the key qualifications the mature candidate may offer:

Experience
“Experience is the teacher of all things,” a quote attributed to Julius Caesar, may not always be accurate, but those who have been around longer have certainly amassed more experience. Learning by doing will always be a key way to gather knowledge and expertise, and those whose life experiences span a greater time frame certainly have had this opportunity.

Expertise
Experience can beget expertise, as the more time we spend doing something, the better we get at it. Thus, the worker who has been at it longer is likely to have developed significant skills in their areas of experience. This could shorten the learning curve for them as a “new” hire.

Real-World Knowledge
As contrasted with theory and concepts, the individual who has been at work and life for a longer time frame has had the opportunity to connect what is being taught and written about with what really happens out there. As I have often said, “For almost everything I’ve learned in life, I can point to a scar.” Sometimes, literally! :)

Demonstrated Interpersonal Skills
“Playing well with others,” being a good team member, demonstrating facility in effective communication, etc., all have had the opportunity to be more developed in those who have been around longer.

Work Ethic
Although this is not universally the case, the “Protestant Work Ethic” is often well developed in those individuals from earlier generations, many of whom have spent extended time in the work force. Showing up on time, being responsible and dependable, exchanging a good day’s work for a fair day’s pay, etc., are often well developed in the mature employee.

Why They Are “Not” the Best Candidates: Mature Worker Concerns
As I am frequently working with individuals who would fall into this category, I will often suggest that the key reasons you may not be hired (or promoted) may include the following:

  • You want too much money.
  • You are not good at change.
  • Your technical skills are poor.
  • You may have impending health issues.

My counsel to these individuals is to demonstrate in their work, online presence, resume, interviewing and lifestyle that these reasons cannot be categorically applied to them as older candidates. With these issues addressed, they are able to present themselves as exceptional candidates based on all of the attributes noted above.

A Word on the Younger Candidate

To be fair, many younger workers can possess these qualities as well. The only item that may not be there for them is experience. But you can address that deficit by hiring them!


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