Posts Tagged ‘careerist’

I’m compulsive when it comes to correct grammar. Disagreement between subjects and verbs feels to me like fingernails on a blackboard. I ALWAYS use all of the letters on my phone when emailing, even when Tweeting! (I’m not bragging or complaining; I just want you to know how challenging it is for me to break my grammar rules in using the following “double negative!) Are you ready? Here it is:

CAN’T NOT!

How does this relate to you and your career development? When you think through your life experiences, the talents you have, your deepest held values, the themes that “haunt” you day and night, here’s my question:

WHAT ARE THE THINGS IN YOUR LIFE THAT YOU “CAN’T NOT” DO?

In other words, what activities, involvements, thoughts, principles, etc. do you find yourself inexorably drawn toward, either in the way you do your work or how you “back fill” your time when not working? These CAN’T NOT’s keep showing up, even when you have difficulty putting them in words!

Over my years in career coaching and counseling, I have discovered the following fact: Even though a significant number of individuals never discover what they should be “when they grow up,” they are constantly trying to do it!

Allow me to share an example. I had a client whose job was to assemble complex systems on which to suspend large lighting and sound systems for entertainment venues. His work was something like putting together full scale Lego™ structures according to specific diagrams. It was important and intricate work. In session, I asked him to describe something he had done that caused him to feel proud, accomplished, something that he thought was “worth doing.” His response to me spoke volumes: “Does it have to be at work?” (Of course, it did not have to be at work, but at least some of it should be!). His answer: he shared a time when he worked with a friend on the design, selection of material, and construction of a customized kitchen system. His eyes lit up as he shared this adventure with me (not unlike the phenomenon of Flow, as developed by Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi – great stuff, you should look it up!). Clearly, this gentleman’s CAN’T NOT should embody creativity, design, and the hands-on manufacture of unique “works of art” – like a custom kitchen! Here’s a fact for us all: if it doesn’t happen at work, it must happen somewhere!

I often use carefully selected assessments with individuals to aid them in identifying these themes, discovering that the best of these instruments seldom “inform” the individual of new personal information as much as they “affirm” for them of where their CAN’T NOT’s lie.

How about you? Can you articulate your CAN’T NOT’s? Are you practicing them? If not, everyone loses! Take action to make it happen.

One side note, some of your CAN’T NOT’s may be too important to do as a living, but still belong in your life…

Trust me…You CAN’T NOT do this!

As the holiday season bears down on us all, the pressing questions for the job hunter/careerist are: Should I take a break? Is anything really going to happen in the job market snowmanbefore the New Year? Don’t I deserve a respite from this brutal process and relax by the fire with eggnog?

Well, YES and NO. To be sure, taking some time during the holidays to enjoy the delights of the season and appreciate those around you is an excellent idea. This is certainly NOT the time to pull out the plastic and run up a tab with the retail industry, but having a sensible, enjoyable holiday time with family and friends is something you DO deserve.

That being said, please allow me to make a case for maintaining a certain level of activity between now and the waning din of the noisemakers on the first day of the New Year.

  1. There is no better time to network.

The holidays represent an extraordinary number of opportunities to see and be seen by family, friends and folks from all over. It would be foolish to not consider all of this “face time” as a resource to increase your “Positive Visibility.” Please understand the importance of your attitude and approach, however. Nothing can put the damper on a festive gathering more quickly than someone who is pumping the crowd for job leads, or who has the “deer in the headlights” look of someone whose career is stalled! Be sure to focus your contact with others in a positive manner, seeking information, advice and referral to investigate and consider alternatives. Remember that most individuals truly would like to help, but are at a loss on how to be of assistance. Allow them the luxury of simply giving advice rather than 1) feeling pressed to deliver that killer contact for you or 2) staring through you to someone, anyone at the other side of the room. My experience has been that, in such cases, most people will choose Door Number 2!

An additional word of warning: be sure that your solicitation of “next step” options and advice is not the first question on your list, nor is it the only item of conversation. Ease into these topics. Ask how they are doing, what is new in their lives. Show honest, genuine interest and concern for them as people, not as networking contacts. Also, help them realize that you are in the investigation mode, not desperate for a pay stub or a lead to that next great promotion.

  1. Many decision makers are at home, not on the road.

One of the challenges of job search and networking is navigating through the maze of individuals who need to participate in any decisions being made. In mid-August, for example, it is often difficult to get the right people in the same room (or even in the same state) long enough to give their opinions, since Smitty is at Myrtle Beach and Ms. Jones just left for New England. This is not as true during the holidays!

Indeed, many people will be staying nearer to home, traveling less and becoming more accessible. Although staffing issues may not be at the top of the holiday list, there are still decisions being made, perhaps even more quickly due to the availability of decision-makers. In addition, the end of the year is often the time when budgets are being reviewed and finalized, and new business plans are starting to take shape. Remember: The best time to get connected is always the present!

  1. Your competition may be reduced.

This is one of my personal favorites! Many of your fellow careerists may decide that this is simply not the time to think career at all (for all of the reasons we recounted earlier) and mothball their power suits until the New Year. As a result, there is high potential that your competition will dwindle. Why not take advantage of this “thinning of the field” to forge ahead? As others decide not to take any action until early next year, your well-placed voicemail, LinkedIn update, tweet or short e-mail may improve your standing. In addition, it’s much more effective to maintain a level of activity than attempting to ramp up again on January 2nd!

  1. Most individuals are more open to being helpful at this time.

Admittedly, this will not always be the case. Certainly I would not recommend an intense networking contact at the checkout counter on Christmas Eve! It is true, however, that many are more full of the “milk of human kindness,” more willing to share and provide honest insights and assistance to a well-placed question or request.

  1. Pace yourself!

Now that I’ve made my unassailable arguments for burning up the snow-covered pavement with your career development, I want to introduce the other side of the issue – we ARE in the Holidays! Be sure to take time to care for you and yours, to be thankful for what you do have, to count your blessings. And perhaps, even sip a flagon of eggnog at least once in front of a crackling fire! Sounds good, doesn’t it?!

Happy Holidays and best wishes to you and yours!

Ready to increase your vocabulary (as in Readers’ Digest’s “Increase Your Word Power”)? Here’s a great addition to your career “toolbox: – COUNTERFACTUAL (n): a conditional statement the first clause of which expresses something contrary to fact, as “If I had known.”.

In his excellent book If Only: How to Turn Regret into Opportunity, Neil Roese describes the two directions wFail Hashtaghich counterfactual thinking can take, explaining why the Bronze Medal Winner at the Olympics is happier than the Silver Medal recipient. Even though Silver is #2 in the world in their sport, they focus up to missing the Gold while the Bronze recipient focuses downward to see what they have accomplished (“I almost didn’t medal!”).

Here’s the Career Application: this “downward” thinking causes the “Bronze Medal careerists” to be better equipped to learn, to develop insights, to challenge themselves to greater accomplishments, while the “Silver Medalist” (without the benefit of downward counterfactual thinking) may find themselves in a self-defeating “woulda, coulda, shoulda” spiral.

Let’s close with a few timely quotes on Failure:

“There are defeats that carry with them the radiant promise of coming victory.” – F.W. Boreham

“We failed, but in the good providence of God apparent failure often proves a blessing. “ – Robert E. Lee

“Failure is always an option.” – Adam Savage, Mythbuster

“Make excellent mistakes.” – Dan Pink (via Johnny Bunko)

So, the next time you “fail,” think downward!

Social Media IconsThat IS the question for many of us — careerists, employers and employees. And the answer is not as simple as it may appear to be.

Can time be wasted, hours of unproductive time spent posting mundane (What are you doing right now?) notes on any of these online programs. That answer is easy – YES!

…not to mention the possibility of sharing confidential information, posting inappropriate content or leaving something out in cyberspace where you have limited control over who reads it. Oh, I know there are privacy settings and related controls to reduce this possibility, but my rule of thumb has always been to assume that anyone may bump into your digital musings (your mother, your boss, etc.) and I type (or text) accordingly!

Even with these caveats, many reputable organizations are creating Acceptable Use Policies (AUP’s) for social networking applications, fully aware that they are true opportunities for their appropriate and professional use. I have  had the opportunity to speak to universities, professional networking groups, Human Resource organizations, etc. on the potential use of applications the likes of LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook as bona fide business tools.

Here are a few examples of how Social Networking could benefit:

  • Seeking real world, almost immediate feedback from peers, customers, contacts on “what’s happening,” their perspectives, insights and thoughts.
  • Providing collaborative opportunities with peers in virtually every extant industry or disciplines that’s in existence.
  • Opening up a communication channel to interact with others any where in the world.
  • Creating an on-line presence for you or your organization that enhances your “Brand” in the marketplace.

Do these potential benefits have their downside? Most certainly, but in this global, digital age, failure to consider the appropriate use of some of these potentially troublesome applications may leave you out in the cold!